Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Korfball is the world's only cogender Korfball is the world's only dedicated mixed team sport. Developed in 1902 by an Amsterdam school teacher for the pupils of his coeducational school, it has developed into an international competitive sport, still expressing the values of controlled contact and cooperative play. Korfball is played by two teams, each consisting of four female and four male players. The objective is to throw a ball through a korf. The korf is a rattan basket fixed at the top of a 3.5 meter high post. The posts are fixed at 1/6 of either end of a 40 x 20 meter pitch, allowing also to shoot and approach the korf from the rear side. Uncontrolled contact is not allowed, as is dribbling or running with the ball. The game requires all-round skilled athletes, as the players must alternate between attacking and defending positions after every two goals. A game lasts 2 x 30 minutes. Scoring goals is done from a wide variety of positions, including shots at high speed in close proximity to the basket, shots from as far away as fifteen meters with unbelievable accuracy, and penalty shots allowed after severe fouls. Besides the international competitive discipline, which is played indoors, other disciplines include outdoor korfball (usually played on grass on a larger pitch) and beach korfball (played on sand on a smaller pitch). Korfball is played in well over 40 countries and across all continents. Its governing body is the International Korfball Federation (IKF). Even though the sport is celebrating its official centenary in 2003, world championships have only been organized since 1978. Korfball has appeared on every World Games program since 1985 and was recognized by the IOC in 1993 Korfball From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Korfball (in Dutch korfbal, which literally means basketball) is a team ball game. It is mostly played in the Netherlands, where it was invented, but seems to be catching on in the rest of the world too. Korfball differs from (most?) other team sports in that it is a mixed sex game. How to play Korfball is played indoors as well as outdoors on a pitch (called 'court'), divided into two halves called zones. In the middle of each zone there is a post (3.5m, shorter for the young) with a basket in the top. The ball is similar to the one used for football. There are two teams, each consisting of eight players: two men and two women of each team in each zone (attack and defence). Scoring is done by throwing the ball through the other team's basket. After two goals the teams change zones: the defenders become attackers and attackers defenders. At half-time the teams change sides. (Graphical depiction of the rules in HTML and PDF formats) http://www.btinternet.com/~afm.sports/korfball/historyofkorfball.htm History Although sources are a bit hazy on this, it seems korfball is a descendant of basketball through an intermediate Swedisch sport called ringboll. The story goes that at the beginning of the 20th century a Dutch school teacher called Nico Broekhuysen was looking for a game that both the boys and the girls in his class could play. In 1902 he played a game called ringboll whilst in Sweden. Back in the Netherlands he devised the rules for korfball. Philosophy of korfball As long as you keep its philosophy in mind, all rules turn out to be straightforward. What, then, is its philosophy? First and foremost, korfball is a team sport. Individual class is essential but there is no room for individual play. Belonging to a team means teamwork; running with the ball or dribbling is not allowed. A player that receives the ball while running, must stop and pass the ball to another player. Korfball is a mixed sport. Men and women play side by side. But while women are equal in the tactics of the game, while playing it's man to man only. One man may may guard one man and one woman may guard one woman. So it's not two against one and a woman may not defend a man nor may a man defend a woman. Third, korfball is a tactical game. Each party tries to win by scoring more goals using tactical skills of the team as a whole. The rules follow this principle and prevent physical strength from dominating the game. That means that physical contact is undesired. Blocking, tackling and holding your opponent are not allowed in korfball. The same goes for kicking the ball or hitting it with your fists. Also, one is not allowed to move the post (which would make it harder to score). Another rule that makes this a largely tactical game is that a player may not attempt to score when defended. That occurs when the defender is closer to the basket and is facing his/her opponent, and is at arm's length, and is attempting to block the ball. International korfball Originally, korfball was mostly played in Belgium and the Netherlands. It was a demonstration sport during the Olympic Games of 1920 and 1928 (which were held in Antwerp and Amsterdam!). (Some sites seem to suggest that the progress of korfball was hindered by sexism, but I could not find evidence for that. Even in the Netherlands korfball is considered by some to be a game for nerds and wusses and the sport is not very popular. Such a reputation would seem to be a much more likely explanation for a slow growth.--branko) The foundation of the International Korfball Federation in 1993 and the existence of tens of national federations seem to imply a international popularity for the game, which has been played in the World Games since 1985. World Championships have been held every 4 years since 1978. Korfball’s origins can be traced back to a Dutch schoolteacher, Nico Broekhuysen. Inspired by a game he had played during a summer course in Nääs, Sweden, Broekhuysen devised the game of korfball in Amsterdam (The Netherlands) in 1902. He called it korfball after the Dutch word for basket, ‘korf.’ Originally the Dutch korfball association concentrated almost entirely on improving its own organisation and little attention was paid to the internationalisation of the sport. It was only after the formation of the International Korfball Federation in 1933 (comprising the Dutch and Belgian associations) that the further development of korfball came to be seriously considered. Korfball was, however, demonstrated at the Olympic Games of 1920 (Antwerp, Belgium) and 1928 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). In the first half of the century, the underlying philosophy of korfball often appeared to be too progressive: namely that korfball is played by both sexes on equal terms. But times have changed considerably. We approach the twenty-first century in an era of greater parity between the sexes and, as the only mixed team sport, korfball both satisfies and confirms this trend. Hence, it has embarked upon a rapid expansion, taking korfball further into the Americas, Eastern Europe and South East Asia. Korfball has developed during the twentieth century from an Amsterdam school activity into a truly international sport. Recent progress has been particularly remarkable. The growth in Central and Eastern Europe is spectacular. Korfball in these countries is spreading rapidly and the overall level of korfball skills is improving dramatically. On the international level countries like Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic have ceased to be marginal. Korfball featured in the World Games (a multi-sport competition with about 45 sports disciplines) from 1985 onwards. World Championships have been held since 1978. In 1991 Chinese Taipei became the first non-European country to win (bronze) World Championship medals and four years later the World Cup competition was for the first time held outside Europe, in India. By remaining true to its twin principles of coeducation and co-operation, Korfball is gradually establishing itself around the globe. The IKF is committed to this expansion. Source: The International Korfball Federation http://www.stusoc.cf.ac.uk/suon/korfball/rules/picsrules.html http://www.stusoc.cf.ac.uk/suon/korfball/rules/whatis.html The Rules Of Korfball 1. Field of Play The dimensions of the pitch are 40x20 m (132 x 66 ft) indoors and 60 x 30 m (197 x98 ft) outdoors, divided into two equal zones. The ratio of length to width is 2:1. 2 Marking The whole field of play is marked out by clearly visible tapes. They must be fixed flat and straight on the ground. The penalty spots must be marked at a distance of 2 1/2 m (8 1/5 ft) in front of the posts as seen from the centre of the pitch. 3 Posts The posts are positioned on the longitudinal axis of the pitch at a distance from the ends equal to 1/6th of the length of the pitch. The posts are rounded and can consist of solid wood or metal tube with an external diameter of 4 1/2 - 8 cm. They are fixed perpendicularly in or on the ground and may not protrude above the baskets. 4. Baskets A cylindrical bottomless basket is fitted to each post. The basket must face towards the centre of the pitch and its top edge must be everywhere 3 1/2 m (11 1/2 ft) above the ground. They are 25 cm (10 ins) high and have a inner diameter of 39-41 cm (15 3/8 - 16 1/8 ins). The rim (top edge) of the basket has a width of 2-3 cm (about 1 inch). The basket are made of osier twigs or of rotan. They must be similar and of one colour; preference is given to hard yellow. 5. Ball Korfball is played with a round ball N0 5 which consists of a rubber pneumatic bladder in an outer casing made from leather or synthetic material. 6. Players A. Number and position Each team consists of four male and for female players, of whom two male and two female players are placed in each zone. B. Incomplete teams When one or both teams are incomplete, the games can only start or be continued, if a line-up is possible which ensures that no zone has less than three players from each side and that in no zone one female and two male players are opposed by one male and two female players. C. Substitution of players Two substitutions per team are allowed. Thereafter only an injured player, whose injury prevents him from continuing the game, may be replaced, providing the referee agrees. Once a player has been replaced, he/she cannot return to the game. D. Clothing and shoes The players of each side must be dressed in a uniform sports costume, which is sufficiently different from that of the other side. The players must wear shoes. 7. Captain One player of each team is captain. He/She wears a clearly visible band on the upper part of his/her left arm. He/She represents the team and is responsible for the proper conduct of his/her players. He/She informs the referee of any change in the team. 8. Referee The referee controls the games. Their task is: A. To decide the suitability of the weather, pitch and material; B. To enforce the rules. The referee punishes the infringements of the rules, except when the punishment would be to the disadvantage of the non-offending side ("advantage rule"). the ref takes action when one side obtains an unfair advantage from circumstances outside the game. The ref decides in cases of doubt. C. To indicate the starting, stopping and restarting of the games by means of blowing a whistle. To start or restart the game, the referee blows their whistle as soon as the player taking the throw is ready and all the requirements (19 and 20) are satisfied. D. In case of misbehaviour the referee can warn the player formally, which he does by showing him a yellow card. They can send the player off by showing him a red card. During a match the referee must not give more than two formal warnings to the same player; should this player misbehave a third time, then they must be sent off. Misbehaviour includes striking, punching, kicking or intentionally running down of an opponent; repeated infringements of the rules, especially after a warning; the deliberate moving of the post during a shot; the utterance of insults, no matter to whom addressed. 9. Timekeeper If at all possible, the referee will appoint a timekeeper, whose duty it is to warn the referee just before the end of each half of the game. 10. Linesmen In each match there are two linesmen, whose duty it is to make sure whether the ball is 'out' and to draw the attention to any foul made in their vicinity. 11. Duration A match must not last longer than 2 x 30 minutes with 5 to 15 minutes interval. 12. Goals A goal is scored when the ball has fallen completely through the basket. A goal stands even when the referee has previously blown for an infringement committed by a defender, provided the ball had left the hands of the shooting attacker at the moment of whistling and was outside the reach of one of the defenders. The team scoring most goals wins the match. 13. Line-up A. Choice of line-up and zones The home team chooses the basket into which they will shoot up to half time. They arrange their players in the two zones and the visiting team arranges their side accordingly. B. Change in line-up If during the game circumstances alter owing to the dropping out of a player, the referee can permit a change. They will order a change when it is necessary to comply with the conditions mentioned in 6b or when the number of players with a direct opponent is less than absolutely necessary. 14. Change of zones and change of ends After every two goals the players move to the other zone and change function; defenders become attackers and vice versa. At half time there is a change of ends. 15 Throw-off The throw-off is taken by a player in the attacker near the centre of the pitch at the start of the games, at the start of the second half and after every goal. In the first case the throw-off is taken by the home team, in the second case by the visiting team and in the last case by the team against which the goal has been scored. The same stipulations apply as for a free pass (see 19). 16. Infringements of the rules During the game it is prohibited: A. To touch the ball with leg or foot. If the touching is unintentional and exerts no important influence on the game, it will not be punished. B. To hit the ball with the fist. All hitting with a clenched fist is punishable, even when the ball is actually touched by the wrist or the back of the hand. C. To take hold of the ball in a fallen position. When any part of the body other than the feet is touching the ground, catching or tapping the ball is not allowed. However, when a player falls who is already in possession of the ball, then they are allowed to play the ball from a fallen position. It is of course also permitted to stand up after having fallen with the ball. D. To run with the ball. Running with the ball is contrary to the requirements for co-operation. Change of position with the ball is therefore only permitted when otherwise it would be impossible to throw the ball correctly or to stop with the ball. Applying these principles three cases are to be distinguished: 1. When seizing the ball the player stands at rest: in this case they may move one leg at will, provided the other one remains in its place. Turning on the latter however is permitted. 2. When seizing the ball the player is running or jumping: they stop first and afterwards passes the ball. The principle is that after seizing the ball, they have immediately and fully tried to come to a stop. After coming to a stop, the same rules apply as mentioned under 1. 3. After seizing the ball while running or jumping, the player throws the ball before he has come to a stop. This is permitted provided the catching and throwing have only taken a very short time or have been combined into one flowing movement. E. To avoid co-operation ('solo play'). Avoidance of co-operation occurs: 1. When throwing the ball away with the intention of collecting it again elsewhere; 2. When tapping the ball along whilst running alongside it ('dribbling'); Solo-play is not punishable: i. When the player does not change his position appreciably (e.g. a player, while standing still, throws the ball from one hand to the other, or bounces the ball to the ground first and seizes it afterwards). ii. When the avoidance of co-operation was not intentional (examples: a player passes the ball to another player, but the latter fails to catch it; when contesting the ball with an opponent a player is not able to seize the ball right away, but taps it along and seizes it afterwards). F. To hand the ball to another player of the same team; G. To delay the game unnecessarily. H To knock, task or run the ball out of an opponent's hand; I. To push, to cling to, or to hold off an opponent: This unlawful hindering of an opponent has to be punished no matter whether this opponent does or does not posses the ball. Every impediment of the free movement of an opponent is forbidden, whether this is done deliberately or not. J. To hinder an opponent in possession of the ball excessively; The hindering player is allowed to hinder the throwing of the ball in the desired direction by actions which result in the ball being thrown against his hand or arm. They are especially allowed to block the ball by bringing their arm in the path of the ball, but they must not: 1. Hinder their opponent in the free use of their body by blocking the arms instead of the ball; 2. Beat the ball or hit the throwing arm i.e. the hindering arm or hand must not move towards the ball at the instant of contact. K. To hinder an opponent of the opposite sex in throwing the ball; I. to hinder somebody who is already being hindered by another opponent; M. To play outside one's zone; N. To shoot from a defended position The shot must be considered defended when the hindering defender satisfies each of the following three conditions; 1. They must be within arm's length of the attacker and they must be facing him; the distance must be so close, that the defender can touch the attacker without having to bend forward; 2 They must actually try to block the ball; 3. They must be nearer to the post than the attacker. O. To shoot after cutting past another attacker 'cutting' occurs when a defender cannot follow an attacker, because the attacker runs so close past another attacker, that the defender collides with or is likely to collide with his attacker and therefore gives up his defending position; P. To shoot from the defence zone, from a free pass or from a referee-throw ('throw-up'); Q. To shoot when one plays without a personal opponent; This occurs when the defence has only three players against an attack of four players. In that case the captain of the attacking side must inform the referee and the other captain, which of their attackers will not shoot. A change of attacker is only allowed twice during every offensive period. A goal made from a penalty by an attacker without a personal opponent counts as a goal. R. To influence a shot by moving the post; S. To take hold of the post when running, jumping or in order to move away quickly; T. To violate the conditions laid down for a free pass or penalty. 17. Out-ball The ball is out, as soon as it touches a boundary line of the pitch, the ground, a person or an object outside the pitch. The ball is also out, when it touches the ceiling or an object above the pitch. In the case of an out-ball, a free pass is awarded against the side who touched the ball last. 18. Referee-throw ('throw-up) When two opponents seize the ball simultaneously, the referee will stop play and will throw the ball up. For this purpose they choose two players from the zone concerned, who must be of the same sex and if possible of about the same height. The other players observe a distance of 2 1/2m (8 1/5 ft) and may only touch the ball after one of the two selected players has touched the ball or after the ball has been in contact with the ground. Shooting directly from the throw-up is not allowed. 19. Free pass A. When to award a free pass: A free pass is awarded to the opposing side after the referee has indicated that one of the rules (16 or 17) has been violated. B. Place of the free pass: The free pass is taken from the spot where the infringement was committed. In the case of an out-ball or when rule 16m has been violated, the pass is taken from outside the pitch, near the boundary line where the ball or the offending player touched or crossed the line. C. How to take a free pass: The person taking the free pass must play the ball within 4 seconds after the whistle has gone fro the commencement of play (8c). All other players must keep a distance of a least 2 1/2 m (8 1/5 ft) until the free pass has been taken. The latter stipulation is cancelled for the opponents as soon as the taker of the free pass moves the ball. If the free pass is not taken within 4 seconds, a free pass is awarded to the other side. 20. Penalty A. When to award a penalty: Infringements which result in the loss of a scoring chance, are punished by the award of a penalty to the other side. A penalty can also be awarded after previous warnings for other repeated infringements which improperly hinder the attack. B. Place of the penalty: The penalty must be taken on the longitudinal axis of the pitch at a distance of 2 1/2m (8 1/5 ft) in front of the post. C. How to take a penalty: It is permitted to score directly from a penalty. The person taking the penalty must not touch the ground between the penalty spot and the post with any part of their body, before the ball has left their hands. Until that moment all players must observe a distance of 2 1/2m in all directions, from any point on the imaginary line between the penalty spot and post. They must refrain from any action disturbing to the thrower. If necessary, the first as well as the second half of the game will be prolonged for the taking of a penalty. http://www.tottenhamkc.ndirect.co.uk/rules.html Korfball Rules Korfball is a Dutch game invented during the early nineteen hundreds. It is the only internationally recognised mixed team sport, combining elements of basketball and netball. A team consists of 8 players, 4 women and 4 men split equally into two divisions of attack and defence. The Name of the Game Korfball is a game for everyone. Men and women of all ages can play. Korfball is played on every continent, with the exception of the Antarctic. Korfball can be played indoors as well as outdoors. And you don’t need expensive equipment to play the game. The first thing you need is a pitch (court), divided into two halves called zones. Add two korfball posts (3.5m, shorter for the young), two baskets, one ball and two teams of eight players: two men and two women of each team in each zone (attack and defence). With one referee the game is ready to start. Korfball: the aim of the game The game is fairly simple. You score when you throw the ball through the other team’s basket. After two goals the teams change zones: the defenders become attackers and attackers defenders. At half-time the teams change sides. As long as you keep its philosophy in mind, all rules turn out to be straightforward. What, then, is its philosophy? First and foremost, korfball is a team sport. Individual class is essential but there is no room for individual play. Belonging to a team means teamwork; running with the ball or dribbling is not allowed. If you receive the ball while running, stop and pass, preferably to a member of your team! Second, korfball is a mixed sport. Men and women play side by side. But while women are equal in the tactics of the game, while playing it’s man to man only. One man may guard one man and one woman may guard one woman. So it’s not two against one and a woman may not defend a man nor may a man defend a woman. Third, korfball is a tactical game. Each party tries to win by scoring more goals using tactical skills of the team as a whole. The rules follow this adagio and prevent physical strength from dominating the game. That means that physical contact is undesired. Blocking, tackling and holding your opponent are not allowed in korfball. The same goes for kicking the ball or hitting it with your fists. Remember, skills are important, not muscles. And while we’re at it, keep your hands of the korfball post: scoring is difficult enough without someone pushing the post. Now what else makes this game different? First, each team must have four women and four men, single sex teams are not allowed. Second, do not attempt to score when defended. That occurs when the defender is closer to the basket and is facing his/her opponent, and is at arm’s length, and is attempting to block the ball. Picture: Nic.-DKOD (NED) (source: KNKV) Official (Abridged) Version Of The Rules Summary made by Jean Frederickx from the official Rules of Korfball as approved by the International Korfball Federation in 1996 and amended in 1997 and 1998 1. Field of play and bench a field The dimensions of the field are 40 x 20 m indoors (with a minimum free height of 7 m ) and 60 x 30 m (maximum) outdoors, divided into two equal zones. The ratio of length to width is 2 : 1. b bench Two benches shall be placed near one of the sidelines, separated from each other by at least two metres. 2. Marking The whole field of play is marked out by clearly visible lines or tapes. Tapes must be fixed flat and straight on the ground and their colour must contrast to the colour of the field. The penalty spots must be marked at a distance of 2.50 m in front of the posts as seen from the centre of the field. 3. Posts The posts are positioned on the longitudinal axis of the field at a distance from the ends equal to 1/6th of the length of the field. The posts are round and can consist of a) solid wood with a diameter of 5 - 8 cm or b) metal tube with an external diameter of 4.50 - 8 cm. They are fixed perpendicularly in or on the ground and may not protrude above the baskets. 4. Baskets A cylindrical bottomless basket is fitted to each post. The basket must face towards the centre of the field and its top edge must be 3.50 m above the ground at all points. They are 25 cm high and have an inner diameter of 39 - 41 cm. The rim (top edge) of the basket has a width of 2 - 3 cm. The baskets are made of cane. They must be similar, of one colour, and contrast from the background. (Synthetic baskets are permitted provided their behaviour resembles that of those made from cane.) Baskets are attached to the posts in such a way that movement is not permitted. If metal supports are used underneath then they may only cover ¼ of the circumference nearest to the post. Metal strips against the outside may only cover one third of the circumference. 5. Ball Korfball is played with a round N° 5 ball with an outer casing made of leather or synthetic material resembling leather. The ball shall be two coloured (preferably white/black). (For Outdoor matches the ball may be one coloured instead). The surface of the ball should not be smooth; the players should be allowed to have a good grip e.g. by the seams of the ball. Its weight shall be between 445 and 475 g, its circumference between 68 and 70.5 cm and when properly inflated shall bounce to a height of between 1.1 and 1.3 m when dropped onto a sports hall floor from about 1.8 m. 6. Players a number and position Each team consists of four male and four female players, of whom two male and two female players are placed in each zone. b incomplete teams When one or both teams are incomplete, the game can only start or be continued if a line-up is possible which ensures that no zone has less than three players from each side and that in no zone one female and two male players are opposed by one male and two female players. c substitution of players Up to two players of a team can be substituted. After the aforementioned substitutions, injured players who can no longer take part in the match may be substituted with the permission of the referee. d clothing and shoes The players of each side must be dressed in a uniform sports costume, which is sufficiently different from that of the other side. The players must wear sports shoes. 7. Captain, coach and other persons attached to the team a Captain One player of each team is captain. He wears a clearly visible band on the upper part of his left arm. He represents the team and is responsible for the proper conduct of his players. In the absence of a coach he also fulfills the task of the coach. b Coach When a coach is present he makes himself known to the referee before the match. He shall remain seated on the bench apart from short periods when he may leave the bench to talk to his team from outside the field or, during a break in play, request substitutions or apply for a time out. c Substitutes Substitute players are expected to remain seated on the bench. 8. Referee The referee controls the game. His task is: a to decide the suitability of the hall, field of play, material (and weather when played outdoors). b to enforce the rules. The referee punishes infringements of the rules, except when the punishment would be at to the disadvantage of the non-offending side ("advantage rule"). He takes action when one side obtains an unfair advantage from circumstances outside the game. He decides in cases of doubt. c to indicate the starting, stopping and re-starting of the game and a time out by means of blowing a whistle. To start or re-start the game the referee blows his whistle as soon as the player taking the throw is ready and all the requirements (§19 or 20) are satisfied. d in case of misbehaviour the referee can warn the player, coach, substitute or person attached to the team formally, which he does by showing a yellow card. Should the person concerned misbehave for a second time then he must be sent off the field and away from the playing area by showing a red card. Examples of misbehaviour include striking, punching, kicking or intentionally running down an opponent; repeated infringements of the rules, especially after a warning; the deliberate moving of the post during a shot; the utterance of insults, no matter to whom addressed; making remarks against the referee; leaving the field without a good reason and delaying the retaking of positions after a time out. In the case of serious misbehaviour (e.g. violent physical aggression) the person is sent off at once by the showing of a red card. 9. Timekeeper If at all possible the referee will appoint a timekeeper, whose duty it is to warn the referee just before the end of each half of the game. 10. Linesman If at all possible in each match there are at least one linesman (preferably two), whose duty it is to make sure whether the ball is "out" and to draw the attention to any foul made in his vicinity. 11. Duration and time out a A match lasts 2 x 30 minutes with 10 minutes rest (2 x 35 minutes outdoors). b A time out is a break in the game lasting 60 seconds which is not part of the game's duration. Each team may request up to two time outs per match. 12. Goals A goal is scored when the ball has fallen completely through the basket. A goals stands even when the referee has previously blown for an infringement committed by a defender provided the ball has left the hands of the shooting attacker at the moment of the whistling and was outside the reach of the defenders. The team scoring most goals wins the match. 13. Line up a Choice of line up and zones The home team decides into which basket they will shoot in the first half. They arrange their players in the two zones and the visiting team arranges their side accordingly. b Change in line up If during the game circumstances alter, owing to the dropping out or sending off of a player, the referee can permit a change. He will order a change when it is necessary to comply with the conditions mentioned in §6 b or when the number of players with a direct opponent is less than absolutely necessary. 14. Zone changes and changing of ends After every two goals the players move to the other zone and change function - defenders become attackers and vice versa. At half time there is a change of ends but no change of role. 15. Throw off The throw off is taken by an attacker from a point inside his zone near the centre of the field at the start of the game, the second half and after every goal. In the first case the throw off is taken by the home team, in the second case by the visiting team and in the last case by the team who has just conceded the goal. The same stipulations apply as for a free pass (see §19). 16. Infringements of the rules During the game it is prohibited: a to touch the ball with leg or foot. If the touching is unintentional and exerts no important influence on the game it will not be punished. b to hit the ball with the fist All hitting with a clenched fist is punishable, even when the ball is actually touched by the wrist or the back of the hand. c to take hold of the ball in a fallen position. When any part of the body other than the feet is touching the ground, catching or tapping is not allowed. However, when a player who is already in possession of the ball falls, then he is allowed to play the ball from a fallen position. It is of course also permitted to stand up after having fallen with the ball. d to run with the ball Running with the ball is contrary to the requirement of cooperation. Change of position with possession of the ball is therefore only permitted when otherwise it would be impossible to pass the ball fluently or to shoot or to stop with the ball. In applying these principles three cases are to be distinguished 1 When seizing the ball the player is standing at rest. In this case he may move one leg at will, provided the other one remains in its place. Turning on the latter is permitted. 2 When seizing the ball the player is running or jumping, first stops and afterwards throws the ball or shoots. The requirement is that, after seizing the ball, he has immediately and fully tried to come to a stop. After coming to a stop, the same rules apply as mentioned under 1. 3 After seizing the ball while running or jumping the player throws the ball or shoots before he has completely come to a stop. In this case the player is not allowed to still be in possession of the ball at the moment that he places his foot on the ground for the third time after receiving the ball. e to avoid cooperation ("solo play") Avoidance of cooperation occurs: 1 when throwing the ball away with the intention of collecting it again elsewhere; 2 when tapping the ball along whilst running alongside it ("dribbling"). Solo play is not punishable: 1 when the player does not change his position appreciably (e.g. a player, while standing still, throws the ball from one hand to the other, or bounces the ball to the ground first and seizes it afterwards); 2 when the avoidance of cooperation was not intentional (examples: a player passes the ball to another player, but the latter fails to catch it; when contesting the ball with an opponent, a player is not able to seize the ball right away, but taps it along and seizes it afterwards) f to hand the ball to another player of one's own team g to delay the game this includes failing to try to create or take, scoring opportunities; waiting too long before passing the ball or whilst preparing for a free pass or changing zones; h to knock, take or run the ball out of an opponent's hand; i to push, to cling to, or to hold off an opponent This unlawful hindering of an opponent has to be punished no matter whether this opponent does or does not possess the ball. Every impediment of the free movement of an opponent is forbidden, whether this is done deliberately or not. j to hinder an opponent in possession of the ball excessively The hindering player is allowed to hinder the throwing of the ball in the desired direction by actions which result in the ball being thrown against his hand or arm. He is allowed to block the ball by bringing his arm in the path of the ball, but must not: 1 hinder his opponent in the free use of his body by blocking the arms instead of the ball; 2 beat the ball or hit the throwing arm; i.e. the hindering arm or hand must not move towards the ball at the instant of contact. k to hinder an opponent of the opposite sex in throwing or shooting the ball l to hinder an opponent who is already being hindered by another player m to play outside one's zone n to shoot from a defended position The shot must be considered defended when the hindering defender satisfies each of the following three conditions: 1 he must be within arms' length of the attacker and must have his face turned towards him; the distance must be so close that the defender can touch the attacker without having to bend forward; 2 he must actually try to block the ball; 3 he must be nearer the post than the attacker; o to shoot after cutting past another attacker "Cutting" occurs when a defender, who is within arm's length of his attacker, cannot follow his attacker because the attacker runs so close past another attacker, that the defender collides with, or is likely to collide with this attacker and therefore is forced to give up his hindering position. p to score from the defence zone, from a free pass or from a referee throw q to shoot when one plays without a personal opponent This occurs when the defence has only three players against an attack of four players. In that case the captain of the attacking side must inform the referee, and the other captain, which of his attackers will not shoot. A change of attacker is only allowed twice between a change of zones. A goal can be made from a penalty by an attacker without a personal opponent. r to influence a shot by moving the post s to take hold of the post when jumping, running or in order to move away quickly t to violate the conditions laid down for a free pass or a penalty u to play in a dangerous manner e.g. when an attacker forces his defender, who is within arm's distance and running backwards, to collide at speed with another attacker. 17 Out-ball The ball is out as soon as it touches a boundary line of the field of play, the ground, a person or an object outside the field of play. The ball is also out when it touches the ceiling or an object above the field of play. In the case of an out-ball, a free pass is awarded against the side who touched the ball last. 18 Referee-throw ("throw-up") When two opponents seize the ball simultaneously, the referee will stop play and will throw the ball up. For this purpose he chooses two opponents from the zone concerned, who must be of the same sex and if possible of about the same height. The other players observe a distance of 2.50 m and may only touch the ball after one of the two selected opponents has touched the ball or after the ball has been in contact with the ground. The attacker selected by the referee for the throw-up is not allowed to score directly from the throw-up. 19. Free pass a when to award a free pass A free pass is awarded to the opposing side after the referee has indicated that one of the rules (§16 or §17) has been violated. b place of the free pass The free pass is taken from the spot where the infringement was committed. In the case of an out-ball or when § 16 m has been violated on or outside the boundaries of the field of play, the free pass is taken from outside the field near the boundary line where the ball or the offending player crossed the line. c how to take a free pass At the moment that the player taking the free pass has, or can take, the ball in his hands the referee lifts one of his arms vertically and gives the signal with four fingers on his raised hand that he is going to whistle for the re-starting of play within four seconds. Following the raising of the arm there are two possibilities (see A and B). A 1. All the players are at distance of at least 2.50 m from the taker of the free pass. 2. When the free pass is taken in the attack zone, the players of the same team as the taker of the free pass are also at a distance of at least 2.50 m from each other. As soon as the above situation exists within the four seconds preparation time, the referee shall blow his whistle to re-start play. The player taking the free pass must bring the ball into play within no more than four seconds after the whistle has gone for the commencement of play (§ 8 c). If the taker of the free pass has not brought the ball into play within this period, then the referee shall blow his whistle and award a free pass to the other side. The players of the opposing team must remain meeting condition 1 until the taker of the free pass moves the ball or makes a clearly visible movement of an arm or leg. The players of the same team as the taker of the free pass must remain meeting conditions 1 and 2 until the ball is brought into play. The ball is brought into play when either 1 a player of the opposing team touches the ball or 2 when a player of the same team as the taker of the free pass touches the ball whilst standing at least 2.50 m from the spot at which the pass has been taken or 3 when the ball has travelledat least 2.50 m from the place of the free pass (measured along the ground) The player taking the free pass is not allowed to score directly from the free pass. B The players do not meet conditions 1 and 2 mentioned above in A within four seconds of the referee raising his arm The referee will whistle twice quickly in succession, the first time to re-start the game and the second time to stop play, and punish the infringing team with a free pass. If players from both teams are within 2.50 m then the referee will punish the player who is nearest to the taker of the free pass. If the referee considers players from both teams are at the same incorrect distance then the attacking team will be punished. When the defending team in the attacking zone makes this infringement for the second time at the same free pass the referee will give a penalty. 20 Penalty a when to award a penalty Infringements which result in the loss of a scoring chance are punished by the award of a penalty to the other side. A penalty can also be awarded for other infringements which repeatedly hinder the attack unfairly. b place of a penalty The penalty must be taken from the penalty spot (see §2) which is 2.50 m from the post as seen from the centre of the field. c how to take a penalty It is permitted to score directly from a penalty. The person taking the penalty must not touch the ground between the penalty spot and the post with any part of his body before the ball has left his hands. Until the ball leaves his hands all players must observe a distance of 2.50 m in all directions from any point on the imaginary line between penalty spot and post and players must refrain from any action disturbing to the thrower. The provisions of §19 concerning the attacking players having to be 2.50 m from each other and the time limit for bringing the ball into play, do not apply at the taking of a penalty. If necessary the first as well as the second half of the game will be prolonged for the taking of the penalty. Back Home http://www.korfball.com/timeline.htm Korfball Timeline 1902: Korfball is devised as an outdoor sport by Amsterdam school teacher Nico Broekhuysen. 1903: Foundation of Dutch Korfball Association. 1919: First korfball match outside Europe, in Indonesia. 1920: Korfball demonstrated at the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium. 1921: Foundation of the Belgian Korfball Association. 1923: First International match: Belgium v The Netherlands. 1924: Establishment of the International Korfball Bureau. 1928: Korfball demonstrated at the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 1933: Foundation of the Federation Internationale de Korfbal (FIK). 1946: First korfball promotion tour in Europe. 1952: First indoor korfball matches in The Netherlands. 1967: First European Cup Tournament outdoor korfball national championships. 1970: Four FIK member countries in one continent. 1973: First international youth tournament (outdoor korfball) for national teams. 1976: First korfball promotion tour of the USA. 1978: First World Championships: 8 Participating countries. 1979: First world tour of korfball. First International Summer Course for Coaches in Papendal, The Netherlands. 1980: Eleven FIK member countries in four continents. 1981: First European Championships for national youth teams. 1982: The FIK changes its name to the International Korfball Federation (IKF). 1984: Second World Championships: 8 participating countries. 1985: 15 IKF member countries in 4 continents; Korfball is played at the World Games II in London (GBR); First European Cup tournament (indoor) for national champions. 1986: The IKF becomes a full member of the General Association of International Sports Federations. 1987: Third World Championships; 12 participating countries. 1989: Korfball is played at the World Games III in Karlsruhe (GER). 1990: First Asian/Oceanic Championships with 4 participating countries; Play-offs for the fourth World Championships. 1991: Fourth World Championships; 12 participating countries in final stages; Chinese Taipei becomes first non-European country to win a World Championship medal. 1992: 29 IKF member countries in four continents. 1997: The word "korfball" appears on BBC TV show for unknown words, "Call My Bluff". Hmm. 1998: 34 IKF member countries. Please visit our advertiser ©2001 Korfball.com Disclaimer http://www.kka.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/kkarules_6.htm Kent Competition Rules - 6th Edition CHAMPIONSHIP LEAGUE CUP & PLATE HOME FIXTURES RESULTS FIXTURES RESULTS DRAW RESULTS REFEREES Lge Sec Mail < General 1 - 8 Referees 56 - 72 Composition of Teams 9 - 20 Misconduct 73 - 77 Players 21 - 28 Protests 78 - 81 Dress Code 29 - 30 Discipline & Fines 82 - 87 Health & Safety 31 - 31 Appeals 88 - 91 Equipment 32 - 35 Kent Championship 92 - 96 Fixtures 36 - 45 Kent League 97 - 105 Points Allocation 46 - 47 Kent Cup & Plate 106 - 115 Match Timings 48 - 51 Progression to National League 116 - 118 Match Forms 52 - 55 GENERAL 1. The Kent Competitions Management Committee, hereinafter referred to as "the Committee", shall consist of a minimum of five members and a maximum of ten. Committee members must be from separate clubs and three of these members shall constitute a quorum. 2. The Committee is responsible for the administration and management of all Kent Korfball Association, hereinafter referred to as the "KKA", competitions running throughout the normal Korfball season from September to April. 3. The general business of the Committee shall be conducted by the League Secretary to whom all correspondence must be addressed. 4. These rules supersede all previous rules. Alterations to the rules may only be made by the League Management Committee and ratified by the KKA Executive Committee. 5. All trophies will remain the property of the KKA and clubs are liable for the cost of repair or replacement should a trophy be lost or suffer damage whilst in their charge. 6. Unless specifically stated, no trophy may be won outright. Clubs will be required to sign an official receipt, recording the fact that the trophy has been presented to them and all trophies must be returned to the Kent Executive Committee by the meeting held in March of the year after they have been awarded. Failure to do so will render the club liable to a fine. 7. All monies due to the committee or the KKA must be paid to the Treasurer of the Association. 8. All matches shall be played to the Rules of the game of Korfball as laid down by the IKF and the BKA and as amended from time to time.